Addressing alcohol and drug-related issues: Reducing harm and supporting positive change.

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Addressing alcohol and drug-related issues: Reducing harm and supporting positive change.

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Alcohol & Physical Health

Alcohol and Physical Health

Overview

From the second you take your first sip, alcohol starts affecting your body and mind. After one or two drinks you may start feeling more sociable, but drink too much and basic human functions, such as walking and talking become much harder. You might also start saying things you don’t mean and behaving out of character. Some of alcohol’s effects disappear overnight – while others can stay with you a lot longer, or indeed become permanent.

Alcohol misuse plays a significant contribution in the development of liver disease.

Alcohol misuse is also an important factor in a number of cancers, including liver cancer and mouth cancer.

Chronic pancreatitis is another disease associated with heavy drinking. It’s caused when your pancreas becomes inflamed and cells become damaged. Diabetes is a common side effect of chronic pancreatitis. There’s evidence that heavy drinking can reduce the body’s sensitivity to insulin, which can trigger type 2 diabetes.

If you’re trying to watch your waistline, drinking too much alcohol is not the best diet plan. Did you know drinking five pints a week consumes the same number of calories as someone getting through 221 doughnuts a year.

Drinking too much alcohol isn’t great news for your skin either. As well as causing bloating and dark circles under your eyes, alcohol dries out your skin and can lead to wrinkles and premature aging.

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